Become
a Member
The Machine That Kills Bad People: Places in Cities + Piensa en Mí
Institute of Contemporary Arts

Piensa en Mí, 2009, Dir. Alexandra Cuesta, 16mm colour, sound, 15 min.

Travel and the stories of those in transit form the focus of this screening featuring Alexandra Cuesta’s 16mm Piensa en Mí (2009) and Angela Schanelec’s 35mm Places in Cities (1998).

A contemplative meditation on public transport in a city known for its freeways and designed for those who own a car, Piensa en Mí draws a filmic portrait of Los Angeles’ invisible population of bus-users.

Places in Cities follows teenager Mimmi between Berlin and Paris – through sexual encounters, family interactions, school and friendship. Rendering her central character and the events of her life in a fragmentary manner, Schanelec flattens standard hierarchies of narrative significance.
The Machine That Kills Bad People is, of course, the cinema – a medium that is so often and so visibly in service of a crushing status quo but which, in the right hands, is a fatal instrument of beauty, contestation, wonder, politics, poetry, new visions, testimonies, histories, dreams. It is also a film club devoted to showing work – ‘mainstream’ and experimental, known and unknown, historical and contemporary – that takes up this task. The group borrowed their name from the Roberto Rossellini film of the same title, and find inspiration in the eclectic juxtapositions of Amos Vogel’s groundbreaking New York film society Cinema 16.

The Machine That Kills Bad People is held bi-monthly in the ICA Cinema and is programmed by Erika Balsom, Beatrice Gibson, Maria Palacios Cruz and Ben Rivers.

Programme:

Piensa en Mí, 2009, Dir. Alexandra Cuesta, 16mm colour, sound, 15 min.

Places in Cities, 1998, Dir. Angela Schanelec, 35 mm, colour, sound, 117 min.
 
06:30 pm
Wed, 27 Nov 2019
Cinema 1

£7 Full, £5 Green/Concs, £3 Blue Members

All films are ad-free and 18+ unless otherwise stated. Groups are advised to arrive early as seating is unallocated.

Red Membership includes free access to all programmes for £16.66 / month.

Essay by Daniella Shreir